Support C4SS With ALL Distro’s “CAPITALISM”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of ALL Distro’s “CAPITALISM” that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with ALL Distro’s “CAPITALISM“.

cap

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.60 for every additional copy.

Three provocative libertarian perspectives on the liberation, corporation, and the Big C.Charles Davis writes that libertarians are very confused about capitalism, and that a radical re-appraisal of the debate shows that libertarian principles should go a lot further than mainstream libertarians have been willing to take them. David S. D’Amato argues, against business reformists, that inclusive capitalism is a contradiction in terms. And while many more libertarians are beginning to wake up to the structural problems in the corporate economy,Kevin Carson points out it’s the capitalism, not the cronyism that’s at the root of the problem.

“Let’s start over. The wealthy elite are too tainted by the current system of state capitalism for us to rely on a “good” and “bad” distinction when it comes enormous wealth. No one worth more than $10 million is able to get that much money without systemic state violence. There is no reason they should get a head start in Liberty Land. . . . no matter what one replaces it with, dismantling an unjust system requires addressing the injustices that system created. If you don’t, then your idea of “freedom” will be attacked as the freedom to be exploited by the same people running the world today. And with good reason.” — Charles Davis.

“The political-economic reality in this country, confirmed by recent studies as well as well-nigh everything we can observe about the political process, is that big capital keeps American policy­makers comfortably and securely in its pockets. And, sad to say, an ‘in­clusive’ kind of capitalism — oxymoron that it is — is not and never has been the order of the day. . . . In conditions of economic freedom — mean­ing circumstances in which land and opportunities are no co­erc­iv­e­ly monopolized — labor would simply enjoy far more bar­gain­ing pow­er, able to maintain self-sufficiency apart from the Big Business economy. In­deed, the way to fabricate a system wherein the vast majority of indiv­id­u­als are inclined to work for a pittance of a wage at huge, face­less org­an­iz­a­t­ion is to use the power of legal and regulatory authority to fore­close other options. . . .” — David S. D’Amato.

“Conservatives & rightwing libertarians drastically under­est­i­mate the extent to which state intervention has been struct­ur­al­ly central to capit­al­ism as a historical system since its very beginnings. The en­clos­ure of open fields for sheep pasture in late medieval and early modern times, the Parliamentary Enclosures of common woods, waste and past­ure in the 18th century, the colonial enclosure of land in the Third World and eviction of native cultivators, the engrossment of Third World mines and mineral resources, the enslavement of nonwhite populations – no­thing remotely resembling the contemporary concentration of economic pow­er and wealth, or the model of corporate capitalism most people think of as ‘normal’ . . .” — Kevin Carson.

“Libertarians Are Very Confused About Capitalism” was written by Charles Davis and published in November 2013 by the online magazine Salon.com. Charles Davis is a radical columnist, producer and researcher in Los Angeles, California. His work regularly appears in publications such as VICE, Salon, AlterNet, and Al Jazeera English. He keeps a website at charliedavis.blogspot.com

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Support C4SS With Barbara Sostaita & Judith Ayers’s “Liberty Beyond White Privilege”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Barbara Sostaita & Judith Ayers’s “Liberty Beyond White Privilege“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Barbara Sostaita & Judith Ayers’s “Liberty Beyond White Privilege

beyondprivilege

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.60 for every additional copy.

This article was originally published under the title “What Would Libertarianism Look Like, If It Wasn’t Just White People?” in August 2013 at policymic.com.

“Within today’s libertarianism, topics like racism and classismoften take the back burner, or are ignored entirely. Is­sues of in­equality and poverty, solitary con­fine­ment and prison reform, women’s rights, queer and trans* abuse . . . are often met with hostility. But Black com­mun­i­t­ies, and other com­mun­it­ies of color, have long traditions of struggling for freedom. Those trad­it­ions, when acknowledged by and com­bin­ed with libertarianism, could create an em­pow­er­ing and radical message. . . .

“Atrue, ideological, libertarian re­nai­s­sance can, and will only, hap­pen if we learn to list­en to those who have lived under gov­ern­ment oc­cup­at­ion: those who live in poverty, are iso­lated, and lack access to resources; those who have suffered in soli­tary confinement; those of different sexual identities; those who are vict­ims of the drug war, political prisoners, sex work­ers, domestic work­ers, or undocumented per­sons. Libertar­ians need to talk, and listen to, the survivors, the ‘others,’ the voiceless and the ignored.”

Judith Ayers is a student pursuing double major in Mass Communications and Political Science at York College in Pennsylvania, who specializes in issues of education, poverty, and immigration policy, women’s and children’s issues, race, and culture and hip-hop. Barbara Sostaita is a student at Salem College focusing on International Relations and Religion. As an immigrant from Argentina, she has witnessed her parents struggle for political, social and economic freedom. Both co-authors are active within Students for Liberty, a growing worldwide network of campus groups for young libertarians.

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Support C4SS with Miriam Daniell’s “Songs of Struggle and Sorrow”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Miriam Daniell’s “Songs of Struggle and Sorrow“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Miriam Daniell’s “Songs of Struggle and Sorrow“.

$1.50 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

A voice rebellious, which should never cease…

This chapbook is a new selection of poetry by Miriam Daniell, edited by the ALL Distro. The 34 poems in this collection were gathered from two main sources: her prolific contrib­utions to Benjamin Tucker’s individualist paper Liberty during 1892; and a series of several more poems prepared for posthumous publication by her friends, which appeared in the Chicago anarchist paper Free Society during 1902.

The Anarchist press of the late 19th and early 20th centuries published much more than ideological tracts, polemics and political analysis. In their newspapers, pamphlets, union halls, radical community schools and gatherings, Anarch­ists and labor radicals alike worked to build a broad, vibrant and lovingly crafted culture of creative solidarity and resistance. Theoreticians, workers, story­tellers and dreamers made car­toons, posters, poems, stories and labor songs. One of the most restless and, for a few years, one of the most prolific of these authors was Miriam Daniell (1860–1894), a strike leader in England and a prolific poet, writer and critic in the u.s. radical press.

Daniell was an English­-American labor activist, writer, and individualist anarchist. Born in England, she helped to organize a wave of textile workers’ and dock-­workers’ strikes in Bristol in 1889–90, one of the most significant labor uprisings in Bristol’s history. In 1890, she left a stifling marriage, and England, together with her close friend and fellow organizer Helena Born (the subject of the intimate “To H. B.,” included here). When she arrived in Boston, she became involved with both the free love movement and American individualist anarchism. For a few years she became a prolific contributor to the radical press, with work from her hand appearing in almost every issue of Tucker’s Liberty for several months running, until her hand was stilled by a tragic death at the age of 34. She left us these poems. The 34 collected here offer a sample not only of her feminist and radical labor poetry, but also her personal and confessional moments, her humor, her vivid sense of the eerie and grotesque, and her meditations on sorrow, struggle and loss.

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Support C4SS with ALL Distro’s Bookshelf of the Libertarian Left

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of ALL Distro’s Bookshelf of the Libertarian Left that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with ALL Distro’s Bookshelf of the Libertarian Left.

$92.00 for the first copy. $72.00 for every additional copy.

We offer trade-paperback editions of left-libertarian books including works by Kevin Carson, Gary Chartier, and Charles Johnson. You can:

  • Purchase copies of individual titles with the listings below; or
  • Pick up a whole little left-libertarian library: 5 books for $92.00

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Support C4SS with Jeremy Weiland’s “Let the Free Market Eat the Rich”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Jeremy Weiland‘s “Let the Free Market Eat the Rich“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Jeremy Weiland‘s “Let the Free Market Eat the Rich“.

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.60 for every additional copy.

“Along running debate among anarchists, especially between the individualist and collectivist schools, centers around the justice of wealth disparities. Certainly the existence of the State serves to enrich particular interests at the expense of others, but in anarchy would the rich dominate society–just as they do with the State? Even if we could immediately switch off the institutions that forcibly manipulate society, there is danger that the legacy of privilege and accumulated wealth could persist for some time, distorting markets and continuing to frustrate the balance of power between individuals . . . .

“The purpose of this essay is to demonstrate how large scale aggregations of wealth require an outside stabilizing force and defensive agency to maintain, and how in a free, dynamic market there are entropies that move imbalances back to equilibrium. . . .”

“Let the Free Market Eat the Rich!” was written in May 2007 at the 6th Density blog. This revised version (2011) appeared as # 33 in Charles Johnson and Gary Chartier’s Markets Not Capitalism: individualist anarchism against bosses, inequality, corporate power and structural poverty (pp. 301–308), and online at socialmemorycomplex.net

Jeremy Weiland is a software developer, writer and left-libertarian activist. He maintains the website Social Mem­ory Complex: a political economy of the soul, and lives with his wife in Richmond, Virginia.

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Support C4SS with Kevin Carson’s “The Homebrew Industrial Revolution”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Kevin Carson‘s “The Homebrew Industrial Revolution“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Kevin Carson‘s “The Homebrew Industrial Revolution“.

$20.00 for the first copy. $15.00 for every additional copy.

This book explores the impact of dramatic technological and social changes on work and manufacturing. Kevin Carson uses real-world examples and theoretical insights to illuminate the conflict between two economies: one a highly-capitalized, high-overhead, and bureaucratically ossified conventional economy, the subsidized and protected product of sustained collusion between big government and big business; the other a low capital, low-overhead, agile and resilient alternative economy, outperforming the state capitalist economy despite being hobbled and driven underground. The Homebrew Industrial Revolution explains clearly and powerfully why the alternative economy is winning–and why we should welcome its victory.

Kevin A. Carson is a contemporary mutualist author and a prolific writer on subjects including free-market anti-cap­it­al­ism, the in­div­idualist anarchist tradition, grassroots technology and radical unionism. He is the author of ”The Iron Fist Behind the Invisible Hand”Studies in Mutualist Political EconomyOrganization Theory: A Libertarian Perspective and The Homebrew Industrial Revolution. He keeps a blog at mutualist.blogspot.com and frequently publishes short columns and longer research reports for the Center for a Stateless Society (c4ss.org).

CONTENTS

  • Preface
  • 1. A Wrong Turn
  • 2. Moloch: The Sloanist Mass Production Model
  • 3. Babylon is Fallen
  • 4. Back to the Future
  • 5. The Small Workshop, Desktop Manufacturing, and Household Production
  • 6. Resilient Communities and Local Economies
  • 7. The Alternative Economy as a Singularity

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Support C4SS with Clarence Lee Swartz’s “The Practicability of Mutualism”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Clarence Lee Swartz‘s “The Practicability of Mutualism“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Clarence Lee Swartz‘s “The Practicability of Mutualism“.

$1.50 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

“The Practicability of Mutualism,” a classic statement of Mutualist theory and practice by Clarence Lee Swartz, first appeared as a two-part serialized essay in one of Edward H. Fulton’s many anarchist newspapers, The Mutualist, published from Clinton, Iowa, in December 1926 and January 1927. This is, to our best knowledge, the first time that the entire essay has ever appeared in print since its original publication.

“MUTUALISM IS A SOCIAL SYSTEM BASED ON RECIPROCAL and non-invasive relations among free individuals. The Mutualist standards are:

  • INDIVIDUAL: Equal freedom for each — without invasion of others.
  • ECONOMIC: Untrammeled reciprocity, implying freedom of exchange and contract — without monopoly or privilege.
  • SOCIAL: Complete freedom of voluntary association — without coercive organization. . . .

“THE LIBERTARIAN IDEAL IS THE ONLY CONCEPT THAT PAVES the way for the operation of Mutualism. Perfect Mutualism could not exist under any form of authority. It would be thwarted and emasculated at every turn. Just as today every social and economic evil that serves to enslave humanity is the result of some form of governmental interference with freedom and with natural processes, so would the same or similar forces tend to nullify and counteract, to all extent, the advantages to be derived from the application of the principles of Mutualism. It is a plant that requires the fertile soil of liberty in which to make its unimpeded growth. . . .”

Clarence L. Swartz (1868–1936) was a California mutualist activist, writer and publisher. He was a close friend of the individualist Benjamin Tucker, and contributed frequently Tucker’s paper Liberty, as well as publishing his own anarchist journal, I (1899–1900). After Tucker was forced to retire from publishing by a disastrous fire in his New York book shop, Swartz became a leading figure in preserving, reviving, and carrying forward the tradition of individualist Anarchism and mutualism in America. During the 1920s, he edited an anti-prohibition magazine, The Libertarian, contributed frequently to Edward H. Fulton’s The Mutualist, prepared and published a collection of Tucker’s short articles, entitled Individual Liberty, and published his best-known work, What Is Mutualism? (1927), a new synthesis of individualist and mutualist thought on anarchist economics and strategy.

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Support C4SS with Kevin Carson’s “Organization Theory

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Kevin Carson‘s “Organization Theory: A Libertarian Perspective“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Kevin Carson‘s “Organization Theory: A Libertarian Perspective“.

$25.00 for the first copy. $20.00 for every additional copy.

This book applies the economic principles of individualist anarchism, as developed in Studies in Mutualist Political Economy, to the study of the large organization. It integrates the insights of mainstream organization theory into that framework, along with those of more radical thinkers like Ivan Illich, Paul Goodman, and R.A. Wilson. Part One examines the ways in which state intervention in the market, including subsidies to the inefficiency costs of large size and regulatory protection against the competitive consequences of inefficiency, skews the size of the predominant business artificially upward to an extent that simply could not prevail in a free market. Part Two examines the effects of such large organizational size on the character of the system as a whole. Part Three examines the internal pathologies and contradictions of organizations larger than a free market could support. And Part Four surveys the potential building blocks of an alternative, decentralized and libertarian economic order.

As long as free-market advocates continue to embrace a theory of the firm that is contradicted by the daily experience of millions of ordinary people, they will continue to be regarded as apologists for big business – and deservedly so. Carson does a brilliant job of showing how the swollen, hierarchical, exploitative firms that dominate our economy are the product not of the free market but of systematic government intervention on behalf of the corporate elite. Carson’s work offers a compelling alternative to both the right-wing package deal (embrace predatory capitalism in order to get the benefits of free markets) and the left-wing package deal (reject free markets in order to avoid the evils of predatory capitalism), and lays out an inspiring blueprint for workers and consumers to take back power from the bureaucrats and plutocrats. – Roderick T. Long, professor of philosophy, Auburn University

Kevin Carson’s book touches many of the key subjects regarding the transformation of our political economy into a post-capitalist, ‘peer to peer’ logic, examining not just the organisational logic of productive organizations, but also the transformation in the nature of machinery and capital goods (which are becoming more and more distributed and miniaturized) and the new culture of cooperation that is taking root in open design communities. I don’t think there is an equivalent book that look so seriously and deeply into the real potential of social and economic transformation, anchored in a detailed study of contemporary productive capacities. – Michel Bauwens, P2P Foundation

Carson brings so-called ‘economies of scale’ down from the clouds so that we can compare them with different economies of different scales we might otherwise have enjoyed of states and corporations had not so helpfully inflicted a particular pattern of artificial bigness on us for nearly 200 years. He analyzes in great detail the top-down bossism of large-scale organizations. Conversant with a wide range of literature on management questions, he applies the Austrian theorem on economic calculation to a critique of corporate capitalism – an area where Austrians fear to tread. At the same time, Carson sketches out an alternate set of arrangements – without large-scale accumulations of political-economic power. All who have followed this book’s emergence will be very happy to see it in its final form; not least because of the work’s systematic and synoptic vision, which brings empirical reality into focus in reltion with the relevant theory. – Joseph Stromberg, Independent Institute

Kevin Carson’s new book offers another remarkable contribution to the theory of the freed market, and his defense of cottage industry and cooperative organization strikes a powerful blow against the ideological underpinnings of Progressive managerialism and state capitalism – an ideology shared by the statist Left and Right, and by all too many libertarian apologists for actually-existing capitalism. In the individualist tradition we have written a great deal about the need for consensual and respectful free association, but not nearly enough about just what our organizations, networks, and cooperative projects might look like in a world free from the coercion of the State; Carson argues exhaustively and persuasively for a vision of a cooperative, localized, green and durable economy – a vision which calls libertarians back to our historical roots in the radical (anarchistic Left), while prodding us forward to a new and fuller understanding of the full social and economic implications of radical freed-market ideas. – Charles Johnson, Molinari Institute

Kevin A. Carson is a contemporary mutualist author and a prolific writer on subjects including free-market anti-cap­it­al­ism, the in­div­idualist anarchist tradition, grassroots technology and radical unionism. He is the author of ”The Iron Fist Behind the Invisible Hand”Studies in Mutualist Political EconomyOrganization Theory: A Libertarian Perspective and The Homebrew Industrial Revolution. He keeps a blog at mutualist.blogspot.com and frequently publishes short columns and longer research reports for the Center for a Stateless Society (c4ss.org).

CONTENTS

  • Preface

Part One: State Capitalist Intervention in the Market

  • A Critical Survey of Orthodox Views on Economy of Scale
    • Cross-Ideological Affinity for Large-Scale Organization
    • Chandler, Galbraith, and Push Distribution
    • Williamson on Asset-Specificity
    • Appendix A. Economy of Scale in Development Economics
  • A Literature Survey on Economies of Scale
    • Economies of Firm Size
    • Economies of Plant Size
    • The Comparative Significance of Scale Economies and Organizational Efficiency
    • Increased Distribution Costs
    • The Link Between Size and Innovation
    • Economy of Scale in Agriculture
    • Conclusion
  • State Policies Promoting Centralization and Large Organizational Size
    • The Corporate Transformation of Capitalism in the Nineteenth Century
      • The Nineteenth Century Corporate Legal Revolution
      • Subsidies to Transportation and Communication Infrastructure
      • Patents and Copyrights
      • Tariffs
    • Twentieth Century State Capitalism
      • Cartelizing Regulations
      • Tax Policy
      • The Corporate Liberal Pact With Labor
      • The Socialization of Corporate Cost
      • State Action to Absorb Surplus Output
      • Neoliberal Foreign Policy

Part Two: Systemic Effects of Centralization and Excessive Organizational Size

  • Systemic Effects of State-Induced Economic Centralization and Large Organizational Size
    • Radical Monopoly and Its Effects on the Individual
    • Systemic Effects on Institutional Culture
    • The Large Organization and Conscript Clienteles
    • The New Middle Class and the Professional – Managerial Revolution
    • Postscript: Crisis Tendencies
    • Appendix. Journalism as Stenography
      1. Scott Cutlip
      2. Justin Lewis
      3. Sam Smith
      4. Harry Jaffe
      5. The Daily Show
      6. Brent Cunningham
      7. Avedon Carol

Part Three: Internal Effects of Organizational Size Above That Required for Optimum Efficiency

  • Knowledge and Information Problems in the Large Organization
    • The Volume of Data
    • The Distortion of Information Flow by Power
    • Conclusion and Segue to Chapter Six
    • Appendix. The NHS’s IT Program as an Example of Systematic Stupidity
  • Agency and Incentive Problems within the Large Organization
    • Introduction
    • Mainstream Agency Theory
    • Radical Agency Theory
    • Summary
    • Toilet Paper as Paradigm
  • Economic Calculation in the Corporate Commonwealth (the Corporation as Planned Economy)
    • The Divorce of Entrepreneurial from Technical Knowledge
    • Hayek vs. Mises on Distributed Knowledge
    • Rothbard’s Application of the Calculation Argument to the Private Sector
    • Conclusion
    • Appendix. “The End of the Quarter Shuffle”
  • Managerialism, Irrationality and Authoritarianism in the Large Organization
    • The Corporate Form and Managerialism
    • Self-Serving Policies for “Cost-Cutting,” “Quality” and “Efficiency”
    • The Authoritarian Workplace: Increased Hierarchy and Surveillance
    • Authoritarianism: Contract Feudalism
    • Authoritarianism : The Hegemony of “Professionalism”
    • Motivational Propaganda as a Substitute for Real Incentives
    • Appendix A. Blaming Workers for the Results of Mismanagement
      1. Senators Were Warned of Lexington Air Controller Understaffing
      2. Dian Hardison. “I F—ing Warned Them!”
      3. MSHA Makes The “Wrong Decision” To Blame Workers For Accidents
      4. Labor Relations in the Health Care Industry for Nurses
    • Appendix B. Corporate Rhetoric vs. Corporate Reality: The Case of “Chainsaw Al” Dunlap
  • Special Agency Problems of Labor (Internal Crisis Tendencies of the Large Organization)
    • Introduction
    • The Special Agency Problems of Labor
    • Labor Struggle as Asymmetric Warfare
    • The Growing Importance of Huma n Capital : Peer Production vs . the Corporate Gatekeepers
    • Austrian Criticism of the Usefulness of Unions
    • Appendix A. Sabotage in a London Nightclub: A Case Study
    • Appendix B. Yochai Benkler on Open – Mouth Sabotage : Diebold and Sinclair Media as Case Studies in Media Swarming
    • Appendix C. DeCSS as an Example of Media Swarming
    • Appendix D. Open-Mouth Sabotage, Cont.: Alisher Usmanov as a Case Study in Media Swarming
    • Appendix E. Open Mouth Sabotage, Cont.: Wikileaks as a Case Study in Media Swarming
    • Appendix F. Stupid White Men as a Case Study in Media Swarming
  • Attempts at Reform from Within: Management Fads
    • New Wine in Old Bottles
    • Lip Service and Business as Usual
    • Management by Stress
    • Dumbing Down
    • Conclusion and Segue to Part Four
    • Appendix. The Military Origins of Quality Control

Part Four: Conjectures on Decentralist Free Market Alternatives

  • The Abolition of Privilege
    • Reciprocity
    • Privilege and Inequality
    • Specific Forms of Privilege, and the Effect of Their Abolition
      1. The Credit Monopoly
      2. Artificial Property Rights in Land
      3. Patents and Copyrights
      4. Occupational Licensing and Safety Codes
    • Appendix. Reciprocity and Thick Libertarianism
  • Structural Changes: The Cost Principle
    • Introduction
    • Peak Oil and the “Long Emergency”
    • The Scale of Possible Savings on Energy Inputs
    • Path Dependency and Other Barriers to Increased Efficiency
    • The Cost Principle and the Work-Week
    • The Cost Principle and Local Autonomy
  • Dissolution of the State in Society
    • Revolution vs. Evolution
    • Dialectical Libertarianism and the Order of Attack
    • The “Free Market” as Hegemonic Ideology
    • Gradualism and the “Magic Button”
    • “Dissolving the State in the Economy”
    • Counter-Institutions
    • Counter-Institutions and Counter-Economics
    • The Two Economies and the Shifting Correlation of Forces
    • Privatizing State Property
  • Decentralized Production Technology
    • Introduction
    • Multiple-Purpose Production Technology
    • The Transition to Decentralized Manufacturing
    • Desktop Manufacturing Technology
    • Polytechnic
    • Eotechnic, Paleotechnic, and Neotechnic
    • Decentralized Agriculture
    • A Soft Development Path
  • Social Organization of Production: Cooperatives and Peer Production
    • Introduction
    • Self-Employment: Increased Productive Efficiency
    • Cooperatives: Increased Productive Efficiency
    • Innovation Under Worker Self-Management
    • Social Benefits of Worker Empowerment
    • Peer Production
    • The Social Economy and the Crisis of Capitalism
  • The Social Organization of Distribution, Exchange and Services
    • Demand-Pull Distribution
    • Local Exchange Systems: Household and Informal Economies
    • Certification, Licensing and Trust
    • Social Services
    • Mutual Aid and the Voluntary Welfare State
    • Education
    • Healthcare

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Support C4SS with Victor S. Yarros’s “Socialist Economics and the Labor Movement”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Victor S. Yarros’s “Socialist Economics and the Labor Movement“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Victor S. Yarros’s “Socialist Economics and the Labor Movement“.

$1.50 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

A sharp look, from a radical and libertarian socialist perspective, at the limitations of conservative trade-unionism and business union reformism. The essay first appeared as a three-part serialized review of George Gunton’s book Wealth and Progress, written for the Boston radical newspaper Liberty, . This edition collects the serialized articles together in print for the first time.

“FOR A SHORT TIME IT REALLY SEEMED AS IF THE DAY OF conservative ‘labor reform,’ trades-unionism, strikes, and boycotts, was over, and the emptiness of the talk about ‘fair wage,’ ‘harmony between capital and labor,’ arbitration, profit-sharing, and ‘the American way of adjusting difficulties’ demonstrated beyond a doubt. Today the fact which most impresses every student of the labor movement is that nearly all the able and influential leaders and tribunes of organized labor are, if not professedly Anarchistic or Socialistic, at least very pronounced in their tendencies and inclinations to either one or the other of these schools of radical and revolutionary reform . . . . Little is now heard about ‘fair wages,’ but the propositions that labor is entitled to its full natural reward, that usury must be abolished, and that capital must be dethroned, are everywhere being discussed.”

“SOCIALISTS KNOW THAT THE PRESENT CONFLICT BETWEEN capital and capital and capital and labor, this three-cornered fight, is the inevitable and direct effect of the inherent and fundamental vice of usury, which dooms the capitalistic system to an early extinction. Because of this knowledge they pronounce all ‘moderate’ measures futile and ridiculous, and regard eight-hours and kindred remedies as about as efficacious as fasting and prayer. Socialists arrive at the conclusion that usury and equity, capitalism and social order, reward of capital and justice to labor, are mutually exclusive. Consequently they do not flatter, delude, or ‘pacify’ the laborer; neither do they waste any efforts on the humanization of capitalists. They declare that the capitalistic order must be wiped out. And all who desire progress without poverty must prepare to bury the whole system of usury forever. And labor, to secure equity, needs freedom, full freedom, and nothing but freedom. . . .”

Victor S. Yarros (1865–1956) was a Russian-American anarchist, one of the most prolific writers and speakers of the American individualist anarchist milieu. Yarros was originally attracted to communist anarchism but later became an individualist, stressing Spencer’s evolutionary theory and ‘law of equal liberty.’ Yarros was a close friend and co-worker of Benjamin Tucker’s, an editor and popularizer of the works
of Lysander Spooner, and sometime co-editor and frequent contributor to the individualist anarchist newspaper Liberty.

 

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Support C4SS with Roy A. Childs’s “Big Business and the Rise of American Statism”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Roy A. Childs’s “Big Business and the Rise of American Statism“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Roy A. Childs’s “Big Business and the Rise of American Statism“.

$1.50 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

In this booklet, the free market anarchist Roy A. Childs takes a careful historical look at the rise of American business empires, and the regulatory state supposedly introduced to curtail their power. A closer look at the evidence shatters the conventional, Patriotically Correct text-book treatment of the regulatory state as a check on big business: in fact it was largely the product of the Robber Barons’ corporate empires: their much-desired creation, their most powerful ally, and their most dangerous weapon against disruptive competitors, demanding customers and smaller-scale alternatives.

“THIS, THEN, WAS THE BASIC CONTEXT OF BIG BUSINESS; these were the problems that it faced. How did it react? Almost unanimously, it turned to the power of the state to get what it could not get by voluntary means. Big business acted not only through concrete political pres­sure, but by engaging in large­scale, long­run ideological propaganda or “education” aimed at getting different sect­ions of the American society united behind statism, in principle and practice.

“TO A LARGE DEGREE IT HAS BEEN AND REMAINS BIG businessmen who are the fountainheads of Ameri­can statism. If libertarians are seeking allies in their struggle for liberty, then I suggest that they look elsewhere. . . . and begin to see big business as a destroyer, not as a unit, of the free market. Liberals should also benefit, and reex­amine their own premises about the market and regulation. Specifically, they might reconsider the nature of a free market, and ponder on the question of why big business has been opposed to precisely that. Isn’t it odd that the interests of liberals and key big businessmen have always coincided?

“LIBERTARIANS SHOULD TAKE HEART. OUR HOPE LIES, not with any remnants from an illusory ‘golden age’ of individualism, which never existed, but with to­ morrow. Our day has not come and gone. It has never existed at all. It is our task to see that it will exist in the future. The choice and the battle are ours.”

“Big Business and the Rise of American Statism” first appeared as a two-part serialized essay in the U. S. libertarian magazine Reason, with parts of the article in issues 2.11 and 2.12 (February – March 1971). This chapbook features an excerpted version of the essay, which is an off-print of Ch. 23 from the market anarchist anthology Markets Not Capitalism, edited by Charles W. Johnson and Gary Chartier (Minor Compositions, 2011).

Roy A. Childs, Jr. (1949–1994) was a New York essayist, activist and critic. As a teenager, he published two essays — “The Contradiction in Objectivism” and “An Open Letter to Ayn Rand” — which became incredibly influential in creating a “free market anarchist” tendency within the emerging libertarian movement in the U. S. Influenced by the teaching of Robert LeFevre, he was involved in the Rampart College Freedom School, the Society for Individual Liberty, publications including The Individualist and Libertarian Review.

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