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Natural Law (1882)

“Natural Law, or: The Science of Justice” is Part One of an incomplete treatise by Lysander Spooner (Part Two was never published). It was first published in 1882 as a book by A. Williams & Co. “The science of mine … Continue reading

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NO TREASON (1867, 1870)

Perhaps Lysander Spooner’s most famous, and most provocative essays, “NO TREASON” first appeared as a series of three self-published pamphlets in Boston, appearing in 1867 and 1870. In NO TREASON Spooner argues, with sharp insight and relentless detail, against any … Continue reading

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A Plan for the Abolition of Slavery (1858)

THIS RARE, INCENDIARY CLASSIC OF RADICAL ABOLITIONISM, printed at Boston in 1858, was circulated in secret by the Abolitionist lawyer and radical libertarian, Lysander Spooner (1808-1887). Spooner defended the natural right of revolution against slaveholders and detailed a plan to destroy the slave system by overturning Southern society from the bottom up: emancipation brought about not by government wars, invasions or occupations; and not by legislative authority and political compromises; but with slave rebellions and sabotage, with slaves rising up to defend and free themselves from enslavement and to render the South ungovernable by the slavemasters.

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Letters to Thomas F. Bayard (1882, 1884)

Lysander Spooner’s first and second letters to Congressman Thomas F. Bayard (D-DE,) challenging all government with the standard of natural law and natural liberty. The first letter is one of Spooner’s best known works; the second letter is a lost treasure recovered from the archives, otherwise very difficult to find in print.

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Vices Are Not Crimes (1875)

This classic attack on political prohibition and moralistic law-making, first published anonymously in 1875, was revealed as the work of the radical legal theorist Lysander Spooner soon after his death in 1887. After the essay was rediscovered and circulated by Carl Watner in 1977, it quickly became one of Spooner’s most popular essays — but remained notoriously difficult to find in print. Until now.