Support C4SS by subscribing to the “Market Anarchy Zine Series”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every subscription or bundle of the “Market Anarchy Zine Series“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS by subscribing to the ”Market Anarchy Zine Series“.

$9.00 for 6 months.  $18.00 for one year.

The Market Anarchy series was created to republish and showcase historical and contemporary articles that highlight our relation to the revolutionary left and explain Market Anarchist theory in general terms.

  • Purchase titles at individual prices, typically about $1.00 / ea.
  • Or get our full print run: 36 Market Anarchy zines for $$25.00 (or only $$20.00 when you order multiples).

flattr this!

Support C4SS by subscribing to the “Anarchist Classics Series”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every subscription or bundle of the “Anarchist Classics Series“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS by subscribing to the ”Anarchist Classics Series“.

$13.50 for 6 months.  $27.00 for one year.

The Anarchist Classics zine series was created to recover, republish and showcase classic texts from Anarchist, Individualist, and other radically anti-authoritarian social movements. We aim to introduce ideas, raise questions, and provoke conversations about the radical possibilities of total liberation, consensual politics and DIY social change.

  • Purchase titles at individual prices, typically about $2.00 / ea
  • Or get our full print run: 23 Anarchist Classics zines for $35.00 (or only $22.50 when you order multiples).

flattr this!

Support C4SS with “The Industrial Radical”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of “The Industrial Radical: Liberty the Mother not the Daughter of Order“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with ”The Industrial Radical: Liberty the Mother not the Daughter of Order“.

$7.00 for one issue. $4 for every additional issue. $14.00 for six months. $28.00 for a year.

The Industrial Radical is devoted to radical libertarian political and social analysis in the tradition of Benjamin Tucker’s 1881-1908 Liberty, Emma Goldman’s 1906-1917 Mother Earth, and Murray Rothbard’s 1965-1968 Left & Right.

For too long libertarians have treated market anarchism almost the way Scientologists treat Xenu, as an “esoteric doctrine” to which one is introduced only after one has thoroughly assimilated some more moderate form of libertarianism — as though anarchism were an impediment rather than an asset in making the case for liberty.

Of course this becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: potential converts find anarchism off-putting because they don’t know what it is, and they don’t know what it is because we avoid explaining it. In fact market anarchism can and should be one of libertarianism’s greatest selling-points, highlighting a radical and inspiring alternative to the present system rather than some variant of economic conservatism. It’s time to put market anarchism front and center in our educational efforts, time to start making it a familiar and recognizable position — while at the same time continuing to educate ourselves and exploring new horizons in market anarchist thought.

The Industrial Radical does not impose a party line; we welcome discussion and vigorous debate from all quarters, and in particular from other anarchists and radical libertarians from the left and from the right.

  • Purchase titles at individual prices, $7.00 per issue.
  • Or get our full print run: 1 Anarchist Classics zines for $7.00 (or only $4.00 when you order multiples).

flattr this!

Support C4SS with “Markets Not Capitalism”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of “Markets Not Capitalism“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with ”Markets Not Capitalism“.

$20.00 for the first copy. $16.50 for every additional copy.

Individualist anarchists believe in mutual exchange, not economic privilege. They believe in freed markets, not capitalism. They defend a distinctive response to the challenges of ending global capitalism and achieving social justice: eliminate the political privileges that prop up capitalists.

Massive concentrations of wealth, rigid economic hierarchies, and unsustainable modes of production are not the results of the market form, but of markets deformed and rigged by a network of state-secured controls and privileges to the business class. Markets Not Capitalism explores the gap between radically freed markets and the capitalist-controlled markets that prevail today. It explains how liberating market exchange from state capitalist privilege can abolish structural poverty, help working people take control over the conditions of their labor, and redistribute wealth and social power.

Featuring discussions of socialism, capitalism, markets, ownership, labor struggle, grassroots privatization, intellectual property, health care, racism, sexism, and environmental issues, this unique collection brings together classic essays by leading figures in the anarchist tradition, including Proudhon and Voltairine de Cleyre, and such contemporary innovators as Kevin Carson and Roderick Long. It introduces an eye-opening approach to radical social thought, rooted equally in libertarian socialism and market anarchism.

“We on the left need a good shake to get us thinking, and these arguments for market anarchism do the job in lively and thoughtful fashion.”  – Alexander Cockburn, editor and publisher, COUNTERPUNCH

“Anarchy is not chaos; nor is it violence. This rich and provocative gathering of essays by anarchists past and present imagines society unburdened by state, markets un-warped by capitalism. Those whose preference is for an economy that is humane, decentralized, and free will read this book with – dare I use the word? – profit.” – Bill Kaufmann, author of BYE BYE, MISS AMERICAN EMPIRE

“It will be hard for any honest libertarian to read this book – or others like it – and ever again be taken in by the big business-financed policy institutes and think tanks. In a world where libertarianism has mostly been deformed into a defense of corporate privilege, it is worth being told or reminded what a free market actually is. Our ideal society is not ‘Tesco/Wal-Mart minus the State.’ It is a community of communities of free people. All thanks to the authors and editors of this book.” – Sean Gabb, director, UK Libertarian Alliance

“Libertarianism is often seen as a callous defense of privilege in the face of existing (and unjust) inequalities. That’s because it too often is. But it doesn’t have to be, and this fascinating collection of historic and current argument and scholarship shows why. Even readers who disagree will find much to think about.” – Ken Macleod, author of FALL REVOLUTION

CONTENTS

Part One: The Problem of Deformed Markets

  • The Freed Market, William Gillis (2007)
  • State Socialism and Anarchism: How Far They Agree, and Wherein They Differ,Benjamin R. Tucker (1888)
  • General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century (selections), Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1851)
  • Markets Freed from Capitalism, Charles Johnson (2010)

Part Two: Identities and Isms

  • Market Anarchism as Stigmergic Socialism, Brad Spangler (2006)
  • Armies that Overlap, Benjamin Tucker (1890)
  • The Individualist and the Communist: A Dialogue, Rosa Slobodinsky and Voltairine de Cleyre (1891)
  • A Glance at Communism, Voltairine de Cleyre (1892)
  • Advocates of Freed Markets Should Oppose Capitalism, Gary Chartier (2010)
  • Anarchism without Hyphens, Karl Hess (1980)
  • What Laissez Faire? Sheldon Richman (2010)
  • Libertarianism through Thick and Thin, Charles Johnson (2008)
  • Socialism: What It Is, Benjamin R. Tucker (1884)
  • Socialist Ends, Market Means, Gary Chartier (2009)

Part Three: Ownership

  • A Plea for Public Property, Roderick T. Long (1998)
  • From Whence Do Property Titles Arise? William Gillis (2009)
  • The Gift Economy of Property, Shawn Wilbur (2008)
  • Fairness and Possession, Gary Chartier (2011)
  • The Libertarian Case against Intellectual Property Rights, Roderick T. Long (1995)

Part Four: Corporate Power and Labor Solidarity

  • Corporations versus the Market, or Whip Conflation Now, Roderick T. Long (2008)
  • Does Competition Mean War? Benjamin R. Tucker (1888)
  • Economic Calculation in the Corporate Commonwealth, Kevin Carson (2007)
  • Big Business and the Rise of American Statism, Roy A. Childs, Jr. (1971)
  • Regulation: The Cause, Not the Cure, of the Financial Crisis, Roderick T. Long (2008)
  • Industrial Economics, Dyer D. Lum (1890)
  • Labor Struggle in a Free Market, Kevin A. Carson (2008)
  • Should Labor Be Paid or Not? Benjamin R. Tucker (1888)

Part Five: Neoliberalism, Privatization, and Redistribution

  • Free Market Reforms and the Reduction of Statism, Kevin A. Carson (2008)
  • Free Trade is Fair Trade: An Anarchist Looks at World Trade, Joe Peacott (2000)
  • Two Words on ‘Privatization,’ Charles W. Johnson (2007)
  • What Are the Specifics? Karl Hess (1969)
  • Confiscation and the Homestead Principle, Murray N. Rothbard (1969)

Part Six: Inequality and Social Safety Nets

  • Let the Free Market Eat the Rich! Economic Entropy as Revolutionary Redistribution,Jeremy Weiland (2011)
  • Individualism and Inequality, Joe Peacott
  • How Government Solved the Health Care Crisis, by Roderick T. Long (1993)
  • The Poverty of the Welfare State, Joe Peacott (1998)

Part Seven: Barriers to Entry and Fixed Costs of Living

  • How ‘Intellectual Property’ Impedes Competition, Kevin A. Carson (2009)
  • The American Land Question, Joseph Stromberg (2009)
  • English Enclosures and Soviet Collectivization: Two Instances of an Anti-Peasant Mode of Development, Joseph Stromborg (1995)
  • Health Care and Radical Monopoly, Kevin A. Carson (2010)
  • Scratching By: How Government Creates Poverty as We Know It, Charles W. Johnson (2007)

Part Eight: Freed-Market Regulation: Social Activism and Spontaneous Order

  • Regulation Red Herring: Why There’s No Such Thing as an Unregulated Market,Sheldon Richman (2009)
  • We Are Market Forces, Charles Johnson (2009)
  • Platonic Productivity, Roderick T. Long (2004)
  • Libertarianism and Anti-Racism, Sheldon Richman (2010)
  • Aggression and the Environment, Mary Ruwart (1993/2003)
  • The Clean Water Act versus Clean Water, Charles W. Johnson (2010)
  • Context-Keeping and Community Organizing, Sheldon Richman (2010)

flattr this!

Support C4SS with Kevin Carson’s “The Subsidy of History”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Kevin Carson’s “The Subsidy of History“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Kevin Carson’s “The Subsidy of History“.

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

This article — excerpted from Kevin Carson’s groundbreaking essay “The Iron Fist Behind the Invisible Hand” (2001) — examines capitalist eco­nom­ic privilege through the lens of the historical dispossession of workers and peasants, and the radically deformed markets dynamics struct­ur­ed by these systematic, consolidating transfers of wealth — opening up discussions on the role of the state in forging and shaping cor­porate power and in driving workers into sweat­shop labor; as well as the trans­formative possibilities of decentral­iz­ed, liberated markets freed from state-capitalist exploit­ation.

“Manorialism, commonly, is recognized to have been founded by robbery and usurpation; a rul­ing class established itself by force, and then com­pel­led the peasantry to work for the profit of their lords. But no system of exploitation, in­clud­ing cap­it­al­ism, has ever been created by the action of a free market. Capitalism was founded on an act of rob­bery as mass­ive as feudalism. It has been sus­tain­ed to the present by contin­u­al state inter­ven­tion to protect its system of privilege, without which its survival is unimaginable. The current structure of capital own­er­ship and org­an­iz­ation of production in our so-called ‘market’ eco­n­omy, re­flects coercive state intervention prior to and ex­trane­ous to the market. From the outset of the industrial re­vol­ut­ion, what is nostalgically called “laissez-faire” was in fact a system of continuing state intervention to sub­sid­ize ac­cum­ulation, guarantee privilege, and maintain work disci­pline. . . .”

“A world in which peas­ants had held onto their land and property was widely distributed, capital was free­ly available to laborers through mutual banks, productive tech­n­ology was freely avail­able in every country without pat­ents, and every people was free to develop locally without col­on­ial robbery, is beyond our imagination. But it would have been a world of decentralized, small-scale production for local use, own­ed and controlled by those who did the work — as dif­fer­ent from our world as day from night, or freedom from slavery. . . .”

Kevin A. Carson is a contemporary mutualist author and a prolific writer on subjects including free-market anti-capitalism, the in­div­idualist anarchist tradition, grassroots technology and radical unionism. He keeps a blog at mutualist.blogspot.com and frequently publishes short columns and longer research reports for the Center for a Stateless Society (c4ss.org).

flattr this!

Support C4SS with Sheldon Richman’s “From State to Society”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Sheldon Richman’s “From State to Society: How and How Not to Privatize“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Sheldon Richman’s “From State to Society: How and How Not to Privatize“.

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

“It’s not privatization per se, but free competition through voluntary exchange, that is desirable. It matters little whether the government calls people who perform its functions public employees or private contractors. When a company becomes a monopoly government con­tractor, to that extent it is an arm of the state rather than a private firm. For that reason such ersatz ‘privatization᾿ devic­es as contracting out the operation of prisons and charter schools merely blur the line between ‘private’ and ‘public’ sector – in the nature of corporatism – and undermine the case for the genuine divestiture of state­held assets. . . .

“Since government possession of state assets orig­inated in one form of usurpation or another, the requirement that they be bought back is unjust. It may be argued that the revenue could be used to benefit the general public . . . but political incentives tend to work in the other direction. Politicians will see the new revenue as an oppor­tunity to launch new programs that offer benefits to well­-organized interest groups. . .

“Better, then, that state assets be seen as existing in a state of non­ownership . . . and opened to homesteading . . . . Government elementary and secondary schools could be turned over to the people who work in them or the students’ parents, or both groups, who would be free to decide how to run them — without tax money. A government university could become the property of its students, mem­bers of its faculty and staff, or both. Some schools might organize as joint stock companies with tradable shares, while others might become consumer or producer coöperatives. Competition would determine which forms best satisfied con­sumers and attracted capable producers . . . .

“From State to Society” was originally published online on October 1, 2012, as the lead essay of a month-long Cato Unbound symposium on “How and How Not to Privatize,” together with fellow participants Leonard Gilroy, Dru Stevenson, and Randal O’Toole.

Sheldon Richman is a contemporary left-libertarian writer, speaker, and editor of the Future of Freedom Foundation’s Future of Freedom, currently living near Little Rock, Arkansas. Richman also spent over a decade as editor of The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, from the late 1990s to 2012; during his tenure the magazine became one of the most important print outlets for left-wing market anarchist writing, publishing key essays by writers such as Kevin Carson, Joseph Stromberg, and Charles Johnson, as well as many important articles from his own pen.

flattr this!

Support C4SS with “No Matter Who You Vote For, The Winner Is Always The Government”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Charles Johnson, Kevin Carson, Roderick Long, and Randolph Bourne’s “No Matter Who You Vote For, The Winner Is Always The Government“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Charles Johnson, Kevin Carson, Roderick Long, and Randolph Bourne’s “No Matter Who You Vote For, The Winner Is Always The Government“.

$1.25 for the first copy. $1.00 for every additional copy.

This is a booklet against elections, parties, constitutional government and voting. It reprints eight essays on Anarchist politics by Charles W. John­son, Kevin Carson, and Roderick T. Long – and a special guest ap­pear­ance by Randolph Bourne – on the failure of electoral politics, the structural limits that quarantine and neutralize any threat of reform from within party politicking, and the pos­si­bil­ity and promise of radical activism and d.i.y. social trans­form­at­ion, beyond the quagmire of majoritarian votes, party politick­ing, political lobbying, legalistic reforms and elected government.

“Iam boycotting the election today. I hope that you will too. I will not vote for any candidate for political office, Demo­crat, Republican, or other, no matter what promises they make, and no ma­tter what party they come from. I do not sup­port them as candidates, and I do not support the oligarchical political machine they represent. If the last few election cycles prove anything, they prove that power-plays beat promises every time.

“It’s not just a few radicals who have notic­ed some­thing is deeply wrong; it’s not just a handful of mal­contents who know that we need a radically different direction, away from the insane and de­structive Beltway consensus — away from this govern­ment’s wars, this government’s bail-outs, this government’s secret surveillance, catastrophic economic polices, shameless fear-monger­ing and con­stant, unremitting power-grabs. But people have HOPE’d and parties have CHANGE’d and if it all accomplished anything at all, it was only to prove that we’re never going to get any­thing but more of the same as long as we maintain a false hope in elect­or­al politics.

“If what you want is social progress, there is no shortcut around prin­c­ipled agitation, grass­roots social move­ments, com­mun­ity organ­iz­ing, civil dis­obed­ience and direct action. There is no low-calorie political sub­sti­tute for D.I.Y. social transformation. Elect­ions and party pol­i­tick­ing are no way to make a revolution. They’re not even a way to make small change. . . .”

CONTENTS

  1. “Don’t Vote.” Charles W. Johnson. Rad Geek People’s Daily weblog. November 2, 2010.
  2. “‘Funding?’ More like, ‘Is.’” Charles W. Johnson. Rad Geek People’s Daily, May 24, 2012.
  3. The Joke of Democratic Accountability,” Kevin A. Carson. Center for a Stateless Society column, September 27, 2012.
  4. “Tea and Sympathy,” Roderick T. Long. Austro-Athenian Empire, April 18, 2009.
  5. “I am shocked!—shocked!—to find that politics is going on in here!” Charles W. Johnson. Rad Geek People’s Daily weblog. February 25, 2008.
  6. “The Party State.” Selections from The State (1919) by Randolph S. Bourne, and from “Show Me What Elected Government Looks Like. . .” by Charles W. Johnson in the Rad Geek People’s Daily weblog, August 28, 2012.
  7. “The Statist ‘We Don’t.’” Charles W. Johnson. Rad Geek People’s Daily. September 17, 2008.
  8. “Counter-Economic Optimism.” Charles W. Johnson. February 7, 2009.

flattr this!

Support C4SS with Kevin Carson’s “The Free Market as Full Communism”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Kevin Carson’s “The Free Market as Full Communism: Two Essays on Mutual Ownership & Post-Scarcity Market Anarchism“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Kevin Carson’s “The Free Market as Full Communism: Two Essays on Mutual Ownership & Post-Scarcity Market Anarchism“.

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

This collection includes two provocative essays by contemporary mutualist writer Kevin Carson. “Who Owns the Benefit? The Free Market as Full Communism,” explores the radical possibilities for market exchange and competition freed from capitalistic privilege and the burdens of artificial scarcity. “Capitalism Without Capitalists?” asks whether mutualistic markets will be driven to recreate the capitalist model by competitive logic, or whether peer production, decentralized ownership and unprivileged market exchange can bring about alternative incentives, and dynamics that disperse, rather than concentrating, wealth and progress.

“Just about everything we identify as problematic about corporate capitalism . . . results from the socialization of cost and risk and the privatization of profit. Why haven’t the cybernetic revolution and the vast increases in productivity from technological progress resulted in fifteen-hour work weeks, or many necessities of life becoming too cheap to meter? The answer is that economic progress is enclosed as a source of rent and profit. . . .

“As surprising as it might seem, there’s a strong parallel between this free market vision of abundance and the Marxist vision of full communism. Commons-based peer production is the core around which the post-capitalist economy will eventually crystallize. . . .”

“Bill also underestimates the different competitive dynamic that would result from a radically decentralized market. We are currently at one extreme of the pole: a centralized economy with production for large, anonymous commodity markets. A mutualist free market would be much closer to the other pole: a decentralized market of production for local use. . . .”

Kevin A. Carson is a contemporary mutualist author and a prolific writer on subjects including free-market anti-capitalism, the individualist anarchist tradition, grassroots technology and radical unionism. He keeps a blog at mutualist.blogspot.com.

flattr this!

Support C4SS with “Market Anarchy, Ecological Order”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Kerry Thornley, Mary Ruwart, Karl Hess Jr.’s “Market Anarchy, Ecological Order: Three Libertarian Views on Environmental Protection“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Kerry Thornley, Mary Ruwart, Karl Hess Jr.’s “Market Anarchy, Ecological Order: Three Libertarian Views on Environmental Protection“.

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

This booklet brings together three essays from the left-libertarian tradition on emerging ecological orders and environmental protection in a freed-market society. The first, “A Libertarian Technology of Ecology” was originally published in the Summer 1969 issue of The Innovator: Applications, Experiments, and Developments in Liberty, a radical libertarian newsletter that ran from 1964-1969. The article was signed by “Ho Chi Zen,” a pen name commonly used by Kerry Thornley (1938-1998), a market anarchist author, counterculture publisher, and Nonprophet of Discordianism. The second, “Environmental Destruction” is excerpted and abridged from “Destroying the Environment,” Chapter 8 of Mary Ruwart’s book, Healing Our World in an Age of Aggression (1993). The third, “Deeper Ecology and Deeper Markets” was originally published as “Closing the Green Gap of Market Liberalism,” in The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty (December 1994), by Karl Hess, Jr. (Karl Hess IV), a left-market anarchist, a noted libertarian ecologist and champion of appropriate technology (and son of the ground-breaking left-libertarian radical and political theorist Karl Hess, Sr.).

“Conservation is often considered a statist bugaboo but, in fact, the problem of ecological upset is a real one — made all the more pressing by the fact that statist solutions of increased legal restriction do not work. Those who do the most polluting and destroying also have the most political influence in a society where government and business are interdependent partners. What is needed, instead of more laws cranked out by conditioned reflex, is the same kind of rational, scientific and cybernetic epistemology that is now used in DISCOVERING ecological problems, but not in solving them! Doubtlessly, such spiraling cycles of thought, experimentation, and data collection on the subject would transcend the legalistic, regulatory solutions in short order. . . .” —Kerry Thornley

“While the market of global process and exchange is essential to the well­being of society, it is not sufficient for most people’s happiness. The market that matters most to people lies closest to home, the marketplace where people gather to exchange in voluntary fashion everything from cash to good ideas to friendship to mutual aid and cooperation. It is the deep market of community, the cooperative flip side to the market of competition and impersonal economic forces. Therein lies the challenge to both greens and market liberals—how to save the marketplace from both the state and the impersonal market. Free marketeers must look beyond market gimmicks to solve festering environmental problems in a manner still con­sistent with liberty. The new environmental commons of ecolog­ical processes and unbounded communities of plants and ani­mals demand solutions that encompass and yet go beyond ord­inary markets and property rights. The environmental commons is a challenge to community—or, in the absence of community, a challenge that will be eagerly taken up by a centralized state in search of an equivalent to militarism. . . .” —Karl Hess, Jr.

flattr this!

Support C4SS with “What Is It That Government Has Built?”

C4SS has teamed up with the Distro of the Libertarian Left. The Distro produces and distribute zines and booklets on anarchism, market anarchist theory, counter-economics, and other movements for liberation. For every copy of Anthony Gregory & Anna O. Morgenstern’s “What Is It That Government Has Built?“ that you purchase through the Distro, C4SS will receive a percentage. Support C4SS with Anthony Gregory & Anna O. Morgenstern’s “What Is It That Government Has Built?

$1.00 for the first copy. $0.75 for every additional copy.

This booklet brings together two recent essays on the corporate state and the production of state capitalism. If corporate liberals insist that we recognize how much government has built the business environment that surrounds us, then surely the next question to ask is – What is this corporate economy that the capitalist state has built?

“There is a deeper truth in Obama’s comments. Many businesses do not merely benefit from state intervention, but would sink without it. Big business’s dependence on government has only increased as government has grown. Yet liberals like Obama and Warren rarely confront the corporate interests that most rely on Washington’s redistribution of wealth to the powerful and socialization of risk. They love taking credit for subsidizing American businesses, but never address (or admit any responsibility for) the full reality of the corporate state. Perhaps they don’t want the inequality they decry traced back to them. . .” – Anthony Gregory

“Libertarians don’t do their cause any good at all when they try to defend big business on free enterprise grounds. There is no free enterprise at that level. No business is going to become big, in this economy, without approval from the gatekeepers. Free enterprise is a system which never existed, except for brief periods of time during historical social unrest. Once an elite is re­established, it’s back to the game. . . . It’s a crooked game and it’s the functional equivalent of Yaldabaoth’s ‘ersatz reality’ in certain neo­gnostic formulations. They replace our real life, our real myths, our real economic and social relations, with a pre­manufactured, pre­designed substitute that keeps us trapped in the spectacle of an honest world, but it’s all just flash and hot air.” – Anna O. Morgenstern

Anthony Gregory, a Research Editor at the Independent Institute and a blogger at The Huffington Post, is a libertarian activist, writer, and musician. He claims to be an anarcho­capitalist, but market anarchists get along with him anyway.

Anna O. Morgenstern, a Contributing Writer at the Center for a Stateless Society, has been an anarchist of one stripe or another for almost 30 years. Her intellectual interests include economic history, social psychology and voluntary organization theory.

flattr this!